• About I’m a Scientist

    I’m a Scientist is like school science lessons meet the X Factor! School students choose which scientist gets a prize of £500 to communicate their work. Scientists and students talk on this website. They both break down barriers, have fun and learn. But only the students get to vote.

    This is the Human Limits Zone. It has a range of scientists studying all different topics. Who gets the prize? YOU decide!

    The Physiological SocietyThe Human Limits Zone is funded by the The Physiological Society. Their members’ research in physiology helps us to understand how the body works. They look at how the different cells, tissues, organs and systems of the body are integrated. Many of their members look at what happens to the body in “extreme states” like when we’re ill, exercising, or living up a mountain.

    You can find out more about the work The Physiological Society supports by going to one of their public events, or having a visit from one of their members. You can also check out the videos and interviews on their website for students and teachers.

  • About this Zone

    We humans are capable of a lot more than we think we are. From climbing mountains under very low oxygen conditions to coping with the high pressure of deep sea diving, we find ways to allow our bodies to not just survive but thrive.

    Climbing Everest is a pretty big feat, image by Lucag for Wikimedia

    Climbing Everest is a pretty big feat, image by Lucag for Wikimedia

    Firefighters cope with extreme heat, image by Saperaud for Wikimedia

    Firefighters cope with extreme heat, image by Saperaud for Wikimedia

    Usain Bolt pushes his body to its limits sprinting, image by Selligpau for Wikimedia

    Usain Bolt pushes his body to its limits sprinting, image by Selligpau for Wikimedia

    Top athletes manage to run faster than most of us could even dream of, reaching speeds of up to 23 miles per hour in the case of Usain Bolt’s hundred metre sprint (though admittedly this lasted for less than 10 seconds!).

    And firefighters deal with the extreme heat of fires every day – a firefighter’s core body temperature can reach as high as 40 degrees celsius!